Quotes in English

Quotes in English

Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975)

“After I’ve eaten talking about food makes me feel sick,” Tito explained, “I’m like those men who, after they’ve had a woman, look the other way.”
“What men?”
“All men.”Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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The room was suddenly invaded by a swarm of butterflies. Some of the terrified creatures crashed into the mirrors in their dash for freedom [...] One came to rest on the moiré silk lapel of an evening dress jacket, with its wings spread and its huge stupefied eyes.
Then it took of again, hovered undecidedly between a woman’s red hair and a glass, and then, asphyxiated by the fumes of ether and chloroform, fell into a glass of champagne, covering it with its spread wings like a paten on a chalice.
“They’re sent to me by a friend of mine in Brazil,” Kalantan explained. [...] “I’d like to have an arena and the most marvelous wild beasts and give them my servants to eat for your entertainment, but unfortunately the only exotic creatures I can offer you are butterflies.”Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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[...] We’re all killing ourselves. We men of our time are all killing ourselves. And the spread of cocaine is symptomatic of the poisoning to which we are all succumbing. Cocaine is not hydrochloride of cocaine; it’s the sweet voluntary death that every one of us is calling for with different voices and with different words.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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At the College of the Barnabites he learned Latin, how to serve mass and how to bear false witness - skills that might come in handy at any time. But as soon as he left he forgot all three.
For several years he was a medical student. When he presented himself for the pathology exam they said: “We can’t allow you to take it wearing a monocle. Either you don’t wear the monocle or you don’t take de exam.”
“Well, I shan’t take the exam,” Tito replied, rising to his feet. And with that he abandoned the idea of taking a degree.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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Bastards should be considered as an elect, privileged caste… like the Japanese samurai… All men should be bastards so that they care for no one and are attached to nothing. The bastard! What could be more beautiful in the world than to be a bastard so that one can despise everything without making an exception for one’s own father and mother?!Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), The Chastity Belt, 1921.

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When I was twenty they told me to swear loyalty to the King… I took the oath because they forced me to, otherwise I wouldn’t have done it. Then they sent me to kill people I didn’t know who were dressed rather like I was. One day they said to me: “Look, there’s one of your enemies, fire at him,” and I fired, but missed. But he fired and wounded me. I don’t know why they said it was a glorious wound.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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There’s still hope for you… You haven’t yet got to the stage of tremendous depression, of insuperable melancholy. Now you smile when you have the powder in your blood. You’re at the early stage in which you go back to childhood.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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The alcoholic retains the ability to condemn his addiction and advise those not subject to it to avoid succumbing to the liquid poison.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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The height of perfection is mediocrity.Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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“Tell me why my heart goes on beating and for what purpose”, Tito asks Kalantan. “If you knew how many times I’ve been tempted to send it a little leaden messenger telling it to stop at once, because one day it will stop naturally, of its own accord, and why should it take the trouble of going on until then?”Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Cocaine, 1921.

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[...] Many despise the riches but few know how to make a gift. [...]Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), Dictionary Against Baloney, 1953.

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[...] Do not covet thy neighbour’s wife, but if you do covet her, take her away freely. When in the theatre, on the tram or in a woman’s bed, if there is a free place, take it before someone else does... [...]Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), The Chastity Belt, 1921.

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In 1920, there is no longer a single woman who wants eternal love, even among those who have always lived in cities of less than 50,000 inhabitants. The eternal love, in all its vile complications of fidelity, retrospective jealousy, absolute sincerity, is a discouraging program. The woman of today does not promise loves in long term but quick solution adventures. [...]Pitigrilli (Dino Segrè, 1893-1975), The Chastity Belt, 1921.